The Biggest Secret in The Capital of Live Show Entertainment — No One Knows How to Market a Vegas Show

Over 100 shows competing against each other every single day. The average spend on shows by an individual over a three to four day visit in Vegas is $39. 40 million tourists come to Vegas every year. 1.2 million local population in Las Vegas. Half a million in Henderson. Out of the 40 million tourists that come to Vegas, only half of them decide to come to a Vegas show. Out of those 20 million, only 10 million will actually pay money to see a show rather than just watch a lounge show or receive comp tickets from their friends. So we are competing for 11-12 million people spread over 100 shows over 365 days. There should be enough people coming to the Las Vegas shows, but why are the shows filled only to 30% capacity on any given day? If you’re not an A-list celebrity like Jerry Seinfeld, Celine Dion, JLo or Britney Spears, how do you get people into your show?

Aren’t Vegas shows supposed to be a cash cow? Don’t casinos pay for the acts? They used to. Not anymore. Casinos “four wall” most of their showrooms now. That means the casinos do not pay a guaranteed salary for the talent that perform in their casinos. Instead, they have the talent come to them and pay for the “four walls” of the showroom. The performers pay for the rent of the room, the marketing, the union light and sound techs, the ushers, the bartenders, the other performers and the set design. What’s left for the casino to pay for? Maybe a little bit of marketing on the property. So now the burden is on the starving artist to gather all of their saved up money and spend it on their show in a geographic market they know nothing about. Sometimes they find an investor – usually a friend or a fan of theirs. But what happens when tickets are not sold? What happens to that friendship with the investor? It still might be the same. But more likely than not, it changes when $250K to $500K is lost in producing and marketing a show.

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So why do artists do it? Because they believe in themselves and they are chasing the dream to have their own Las Vegas show. It’s not only a dream but it also helps their credibility and stature in the entertainment and corporate world because they are able to boast that they have a Vegas show. It’s a great thing to be able to show off on your resume when you have to perform out of town in Pocatello, Idaho or Spearfish, South Dakota.

But how does a performer keep their show in Las Vegas? How does an entertainer start a show and not lose any money? In what resources should they put their marketing money? Why do shows fold in two weeks or two months or two years? Why is the success rate of having a show in Las Vegas last for more than six months so low?

The answer is very few people know how to market shows in Las Vegas. Even the biggest show producers in town will have shows that flop or end early due to a lack of attendance. Does anyone have a real, solid formula for getting people through the door? Most likely not.

However, that is what TickleMe Entertainment has been working on for the past five years. We are working on creating a website and app that will consolidate the top marketing sources for shows onto one platform that can be purchased on a subscription basis in order to help increase ticket sales. And when this is created, the basic fundamentals of how to market a show will be shared for all show marketers, producers and entertainers to receive and use for their own benefit. TME will not keep this information a secret. It will share the information for every single show and performer that want to know the keys to the kingdom. If in academia it’s called “Publish or Perish”, in Vegas it’s called “Paid Tickets or Perish.” But our company will do everything we can so that every single artist has access and the opportunity to receive the best education and tools to be able to make their show a success whether it is on the Strip or off the Strip.